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Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)
." and the age of aware just spawned the number of exotic religions, including zen buddhism and hindu meditation and from there into the jesus freak youth movement which swept through the ranks of the drug-depleted and sex-sated surfers of california and and from there into the jesus freak youth movement which swe . now, imam, do you detect any impact of the affluence of today on the spirituality of your -- your flock? >> indeed. i do believe that if i were to go back 20 years or see where muslims are going now, i do believe that the economic situation of muslims and the worldwide community will influence the way muslims see islam and see islam's spirituality as the way out of the dispair, out of the harmlessness, out of the -- homelessness and poverty that mums limbs have been experienced in the last 20 years. >> you serve as a muslim chaplain of georgetown university which is a roman catholic university in the sense it's run by jesuit priests, right? >> indeed, yeah. >> now, how is that going? >> i think it has gone, so far, very well. i have enjoyed working with the jesuits, with the roman ca
to find out that money stands in the way of the public knowing more about her. >> reporter: for "religion & ethics newsweekly", i'm david tereshchuk. >>> the city of grand rapids, michigan, long ago became known as a place of strict dutch reformed calvinism. so in 2012, it was something of a surprise when grand rapids organized a year-long series of events all designed to promote interfaith understanding. by all accounts, the campaign was a great success, as judy valente reports. >> reporter: grand rapids, michigan, is a city with deep roots in conservative calvinist christianity -- a place where dancing and card-playing were once banned, mowing the lawn on sunday was frowned upon into the 1960s, and in more recent years, a professor who taught evolution at calvin college encountered harsh criticism. though the dutch reformed church and its more conservative offshoot, the christian reformed church, is still a strong presence here, grand rapids today is also home to 82 catholic parishes, 5 mosques, 2 synagogues, and hindu, buddhist and sikh temples. interfaith dialogue would have been cons
in the sustainability of religion and population agents. we will get to those during the next hour but first why don't you answer for me the question of every reporter has asked by his or her editor when that reporter approaches with a story idea. why does this matter? why is it important? >> guest: it's important because the fertility rates and demographics are what my friend and demographer in town here says it's like the tectonic plate shifting beneath the earth and demography isn't quite destiny but it's close. once you know what the demographic profile country and society's going to be then you are able to tell what are the confines in which this reality will have to live in the country? so what we have seen now in the global phenomena is everywhere from sweden to america and canada to i ran to singapore is people choosing to have fewer and fewer children. this is the first time in human history that this is happen voluntarily on a global scale and it's going to have far-reaching consequences for everyone. >> host: well how do we know that fertility is -- that is how is it measured and are we t
a right to your religion. no help from the government at all on friday. >> this is part what have kathleen sebelius had to say. she said, today the administration is taking the next step in providing women across the nation with coverage of recommended preventive care at no cost, while reporting religious concerns. the administration believes it has met the concerns. >> well, shannon, for the many people whose religious rights are violated by this mandate, many of them have sued. they have been waiting for well over a year for something very simple, an exemption from the mandate. simply, that's what we do with people who have religious objections to laws. we exempt them. that's what these people have been waiting for and that's not what they got. the exemption that only applies to a house of worship was not expanded one inch. so the administration didn't do anything for the exemption or the business owners like hobby lobby. all they really did was propose a bookkeeping measure for certain religious organizations that may not really solve the problem at all. it wasn't a good feds for the re
religion. his agent comes out and says he's going to take this training now where he's going to talk to at-risk gay kids in san francisco. i don't know what that means. only thing i know is that ray lewis had it exactly right. when ray lewis was asked this question, he said, you know what, i'm not here to talk about world issues, i'm here to talk about locker room issues. that's a veteran move. >> we're going to talk about ray lewis. you're right, all of a sudden, though, people find religion when you start talking about taking things away from them and their bank account and all of a sudden they find religion like, oh, i didn't mean him. i'm not homophobic or racist. we're going to -- stick around, guys. we're going to talk about ray lewis. no stranger to controversies or super bowls. [ female announcer ] born from the sweet monk fruit, something this delicious could only come from nature. new nectresse. the 100% natural no-calorie sweetener made from the goodness of fruit. new nectresse. sweetness naturally. new nectresse. all right that's a fifth-floor probleok.. not in my house! ha ha
up children, health, danger, a settlement disputes, war, religion, and speaking more than one language. this book is my most personal book, my book of, i think, the most practical value to our daily lives, and, as a shameless author, i hope it is going to be my best-selling book. [laughter] it is about one i have learned from spending a lot of my time in traditional tribal societies in new guinea of the last 60 years, and it is about what friends and others have learned from other trouble societies around the world. the essence of living in big, industrial societies and permanent housing with central governments to make decisions with writing and books and the internet. most people live past age 60, where we regularly encounter strangers, just as i am encountering you this evening, and we are most of us eating food -- food grown by older people. we forget that every one of those things arose very recently in human history. humans have constituted a separate line of biological evolution for about 6 million years. all of the things that i just mentioned did not exist anywhere in
with all these different languages and religions and basically for the first 50 years, almost certainly the first several decades people back in washington were saying what have we done here? we conquered this land but we don't understand it and we can't govern it. we should just give it all back to mexico. it's too hard to run this place. there was so much violence and slavery. there was the hostagetaking and it was just unfamiliar country that people in washington didn't know what to do with. so that is part to. part three is really about carson's role in the conquest of the novel hope people and everything he did with that. is a sort of the final act of his long career and that's probably what he is best known for, the sort of a scorched earth campaign that he led into nobilo country that resulted in their conquest and their removal from their beloved land and this great experiment that went on to try to force the novel hope to become -- to settle down and become farmers and christians living on these reservations on the border of texas. it's a big sprawling book that has many parts
idea that the first one that was abandoned. there are a lot of religions. the left turned against religion . it will pass the movement inspiration in the dr. king magnificent formula of equal votes, 1 foot in the scripture, 1 foot in the constitution. the next thing you know, returning against the spiritual base of democracy. we must remember the civil war with the century. that was grilling of manila. my textbooks of the civil war had nothing to do with slavery. to this the their textbooks in history have referred to the political movements that overthrew the lincoln government after the civil war and restored boys of permissiveness of and pair of the way for server edition. the text which refer to the move and as the redeemer. the retainers faugh terrorism as much as the terrorism the play is a world where so attuned to when it is not. grace has the power of turning your whole sense of perception of side down. the odds of internal politics of saddam. one of the chapters, but to together by 1964. yet the democratic convention and republican convention. the republicans with a part
the corner -- what gets me is how all of a sudden they get this sensitivity religion. his agent comes out and says he's going to take this training now where he's going to talk to at-risk gay kids in san francisco. i don't know what that means. only thing i know is that ray lewis had it exactly right. when ray lewis was asked this question, he said, you know what, i'm not here to talk about world issues, i'm here to talk about locker room issues. that's a veteran move. >> we're going to talk about ray lewis. you're right, all of a sudden, though, people find religion when you start talking about taking things away from them and their bank account and all of a sudden they find religion like, oh, i didn't mean him. i'm not homophobic or racist. we're going to talk about ray lewis. no stranger to controversies or super bowls. all stations come over to mission a for a final go. this is for real this time. step seven point two one two. verify and lock. command is locked. five seconds. three, two, one. standing by for capture. the most innovative software on the planet... dragon is captured. is
are the ones in charge of religion. i find out the second are translation. i don't care what people think about the translation, no one asked for the translation. the people of god did not. this again is something imposed from above. these are not the styles of vatican ii. i don't question what a pope with do. that's not my prerogative. i do question the way we do things. that is something i would say does not seem to be a vatican ii way. >> you've always done things right dave. i love you and you're a great friend. talking too about the mass the words i missed from the mass and those who have left this world. i love that. we only got about a minute left. tell us what we should know. you said people should google the united states council of catholic bishops for the documents and for some comments, you say they have a very good perspective towards vatican ii. do that and google and you can find things there and exhort us. >> any time this year. you're a faith you can get some understanding of vatican ii. also by reading the text because they are
poor of all colors stripes tongues and religions that your country wronged you in separate and discrete ways, gronke with horrific and lingering consequences, wronged you in some cases from long ago and for a very long time, to a degree that would morally compel any civilized nation serious and sustained attention. >> guest: we don't want to talk about it. we still don't want to talk about it. we run from it. we now call it victimization, so it's not to be raised. it's a sad truth. >> host: why did you leave the country? >> guest: well i was as much going to a place as leaving a place. i have been going to st. kitts in the caribbean for 25 years, and it's a small island. it is made for someone like me who doesn't like big crowded places, big cities. it's an exquisitely beautiful place with mountains and clear blue water and a kind of smallness that allows the kind of intimacy you seldom go downtown and don't see someone that you know. but the biggest piece of it is that the woman i loved and married is from st. kitts, so we had decided many years ago that we were going to build a home t
religions, so so religion does well. this whole wall behind me is paperback fiction, and that rolls out of here on a steady basis both to locals and to visitors who want something light to read while they're traveling and nothing tooer the or my important -- too terribly important. the opera breakfast meets here all winter long before the simulcasts from the metropolitan opera which comes to santa fe along with millions of other viewers across the world. and there's a breakfast here and a lecture, so we do a lot with music, a lot with art and pretty much everything. the history of santa fe is rooted in three major cultures; the native american, the his hispanic and the anglo. now that's, obviously, oversimplifying things. but each one carries a heritage that the writers are anxious to share. we boast the best of the young native american writers working today up at the indian school. we do events for them here. we boast the best of the spanish colonial art market. we sell books up at the indian market in august which is the large native american art market in the world, and for many yea
of resistance to federal rule in new mexico. what is going on today with the rich and diverse bodies of religion in santa fe, but we constructed that on top of this foundation of faith being part of santa fe's history from the very start. santa fe has been the subject of many books by many writers, a diverse range of writers, and this book has a terrific bibliography for anyone who wants to read more about santa fe. >> and now more from santa fe, new mexico, home to about 80,000 people and 250 art galleries. santa fe boasts a rich historical and literary culture. with the help of our local cable partner, comcast, booktv takes a tour of collected works bookstore, one of santa fe's 17 independent bookstores. >> welcome to collected works bookstore and coffeehouse. we're in santa fe, new mexico. my name is dorothy massey, and my daughter and co-owner have owned collected works for the last 18 of its now 35 years old as santa fe's oldest and, we think, best in the city. santa fe has a population of 80,000 people, and it supports no less than 17 independent bookstores. how does collected works and th
freedom of expression, freedom of religion, those are not just american values. the world agreed to those values and we are going to stand up for them. it is not always easy. we have to pick our time. on the first level, do what we do because it is in our interests. we have to continue to do that. as you got to the second level, how you adapt that to the world of today requires us to be more clever we are trying to do that. countering violent extremism. maybe there are 50,000 violent homicidal extremist in the world. but they are able to maximize their impact and their messaging through the internet. what we have tried to do is to get in there with them, to undermine them and to rebut them. it is something we did in the cold war. more lessons i think we can transfer from the cold war to today. we don't have some monolithic soviet union. we were engaged in pushing out our ideas and our values, refuting communist propaganda. the cold war ended. "democracy has triumphed. we do not have to do that anymore." that's a terrible mistake. i have tried to convince congress and others if we do not h
or whatever else their islamic religion requires. >> but when you look at the obvious oppression of nearly 2 million palestinians on the gaza strip in particular, it's a terribly depressing -- >> sure. >> helpless situation. >> and they could change it. they could change it. >> can only they change it or do the israelis have to also give a little bit? >> of course. >> everything about compromise? >> of course the israelis have to give, and they will. and omar, who was the prime minister, said he was within a hair's breath of dealing with abu abbas, but it's the fear that the palestinian leadership has that if they enter into a treaty with israel, they will be murdered. >> when you see the political rhetoric being deployed not just there but in washington in particular, it's so vicious now. >> it is. >> you went through a bit of this yourself, very personal in nature. >> yeah. >> when you see it now, is it as bad as it has ever been, do you think? >> worse. i enjoyed my stay in congress. most people today do not. too many people who have been elected really don't understand the nature of gove
's religion, democracy. every american loves democracy. i grant that. i plead guilty to taking that drug. i am right there with you. there is much more going on here. anybody who knows the middle east understands that the borders were drawn around peoples who do not want to live together. we have seen this in israel. palestinians and jews do not want to live together. we could say, let's have democracy. jews do not want a one state solution. neither the palestinians. it is not about democracy in palestine israel. we said we are going to make democracy in iraq. they pushed the sunnis out of every job in the military, government, education system. that is what is going to happen. anybody who thinks that when the sunnis takeover in syria that they are going to incorporate the national institutions are full and themselves. those institutions have been jammed full of the minorities who have had their foot on the throat of the sunnis for the last 50 years. the aloe-ites who dominate the military structure and tons of other ministries and fill them up with minorities and sunnis who are sympathetic to
as you would have them do unto you. all cultures and races and religions. >> is that him. >> he is not in the painting. that is a farmer that was a end from of his in vermont where he lived at the time. >> who is this over here. >> one of my favorites. you can almost taste the turkey. >> quintessential thanksgiving piece. done for a very serious purpose during world war ii to articulate president roosevelts four freedoms. freedom of speech, freedom from want. fear dom from fear and freedom to worship. these are the reasons america went into war to preserve these freedoms for people all over the world. >> he also made statements too, look at this. >> after he stopped working for the saturday evening post where he had done 321 magazine covers through the his lifetime went to work for look magazine. the subject matter changed greatly and he he started painting the current events of the day and did some very important civil rights movement paintings. this young girl is walking to school will protected by the u.s. marshals i want indicating the first elementary school in new orleans.
's almost a religion there. people are dedicated to it. our two boys, i grew up a football fanatic and our boys played soccer. we were against them going into football because of the head injuries. the difference between soccer and football is two days a week practice versus five days a week. >> we are going to stay on this. we have much more to talk about including our complicity as viewers, lovers of the game in this question. stay there. up next, football's toughest call. why some players are willing to risk their health for what feels like big money and a better life. [ snoring ] ♪ [ snoring ] [ male announcer ] zzzquil™ sleep-aid. [ snoring ] [ snoring ] [ male announcer ] it's not for colds. it's not for pain. it's just for sleep. [ snoring ] [ male announcer ] because sleep is a beautiful thing™. [ birds chirping ] zzzquil™. the non-habit forming sleep-aid from the makers of nyquil®. ♪ wears off. [ female announcer ] stop searching and start repairing. eucerin professional repair moisturizes while actually repairing very dry skin. the end of trial and error has arrived. t
have wanted to shut up those who would criticize government, to suppress unpopular religions, or disarm people. the president cited constitutional protections of individual rights as the basis for expanded federal power or lives of private individuals. this is the same president who exceeded his power under the constitution to appoint recess appointments. no wonder millions of americans fear the president might take executive action and congress may enact legislation that could lead to a tyrannical federal government. i cannot accept the president's claim that there will be politicians and special interests warning of tyrannical all-out assault on liberty, not because that is true, but because they want to gin up fear. this understandably leads many citizens to figure that their individual rights will be violated. that extends well beyond the second amendment. it should be a matter of deep concern to all of us. the constitution for 225 years established a government that is a servant of the people, not the master. as we consider and debate legislation arising from these tragedies, i hop
the organization that it is religious and they want their employees to be similar religion. >> gregg: and they have every right. >> it's called the ministerial exception. it's in case law. it's exactly on point. if you are religious entity and focus is on that, there is a standard. they can make selections and appointments with hiring that are the same religious ilk. >> forprofit and nonprofit and you bring in the fair employment housing act. >> gregg: that is good point. by the way, that supreme court decision that we cited, due drew distinction forprofit and not. >> they are saying it's partially not for profit. this school says it is for profit, but i think that the court is going to still be the ministerial exception rule not for not for profits. >> gregg: if there is anybody that is performing a ministerial duty isn't it the teacher in the classroom, it's not the janitor. >> exactly right. >> that is the distinction in the supreme court case. >> gregg: ministerial distinction prevails. >> the ministers and teachers and not ministers. so it doesn't necessarily prevail. second of all, a minister
these different languages and religions and basically for the first 50 years, certainly the first several decades people in washington were saying but if we done here? would conquer this land, but we didn't understand it and became governor. we should give it all back to mexico. it's too hard to run this place. there is just so much violence, so much slavery and hostagetaking in some unfamiliar country that people in washington didn't know what to do with. so that's part 2. part 3 is about carson's role in the conquest of the navajo people in everything he did with that monster slayer and this is the final act of his long career and probably woody's best known for common disorders campaign that is added to non-country that resulted in the conquest from their beloved land in this great experiment that went on to force the navajos to become farmers and christians living in the reservation and on the border with texas. so that's a big outfit has been a parts and the remarkable thing is kit carson is the through line that makes it make sense. he intersect did with all these aspects of his story out h
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)

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